A Hero’s Legend: An evening with the Music of Hyrule

The year was 1986, and I was only four years old.  I wouldn’t know of it’s existence for a few more years, but that’s the year the “golden cartridge” known as The Legend of Zelda appeared on the 8-bit video game scene dominated by the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) and changed things, forever. That golden cartridge gave us Link, the Hero of the Land of Hyrule, destined to confront and defeat Ganon, the Dark One with an iron grip on the land, Princess Zelda in his dungeon, and the power of the Triforce in the balance.  But it was only the beginning, as this legend has spawned numerous video games, music, apparel, philosophy book, and even a short lived cartoon.    While in many ways  built on what had come before, such as Dungeons and Dragons on the Mattel Intellevision; a game I have fond memories of playing with my Dad, Zelda took things to a whole new level.  The golden cartridge has left a hero’s legacy that is far from over, with the new Nintendo Wii U releasing later this year

A portion of that “hero’s legacy” lies with the music made famous by these games over the last quarter-century; The Main Theme, Zelda’s Theme, The Song of Time, The Lost Woods, Guredo Valley, and many melodies played on the mythic Ocarina in Legend of Zelda:  Ocarina of Time – the Zelda game that’s generally considered perfect.    I’ve spent many hours over the years enjoying the music of this franchise, second only to Star Wars, and Thursday night I finally got to see it live.  A friend and I heard about the possibility of the Legend of Zelda Symphony coming to our area and successfully plotted to attend; an event such as this is the musical version of seeing a Star Wars film or The Avengers at 12:01 am, complete with some in costume.  In a performance like this, musical pieces are arranged according to the games they came from, and each musical piece uses music from within the game to accompany the telling of the story of that game on the screen; something similar to Star Wars in Concert (which I attended a few years ago).

The show began with a “Legend of Zelda Overture” exploring the use of the “Overworld Themes” in the various games, and a “Dungeon Suite” to highlight the many variations of labrynthian tone in the Zelda-verse, after which the creative producer arrived on stage brandishing the legendary “golden cartridge” and the crowd came alive with clapping and cheers.  That moment was only outdone a later in the concert when  the conductor of the orchestra stopped the show in between the Ocarina of Time suite and the Windwaker suite to draw the attention of the audience to the fact that she would be conducting the Windwaker suite with the actual Windwaker baton, and this too was met with much clapping and cheers.  It was after the Ocarina and Windwaker suites that the storms started, and led many a fan to make references and jokes about both the Windwaker baton and the “Song of Storms” from Ocarina of Time (maybe it was one of those “you had to be there” sort of things).  The show continued in spite of the rain, fitting as the orchestra moved into the darker world of Twilight Princess and then into Link to the Past (as that story starts “on a dark and stormy night”).  It was after this musical number – and the included “finale” – that some thought the show was finished and started to exit, but far from it.

The creative producer took to the stage again to introduce the first encore as “coming from a small cartridge”, which meant we were headed into GameBoy territory with “The Ballad of the Wind Fish” from Legend of Zelda:  Link’s Awakening; a game I spent many hours playing on both black/white and color screens.  At this point I knew the show couldn’t be over, as the most epic of all Legend of Zelda tunes had yet to be heard, the theme for the almost amazonian tribe of characters in Hyrule known as the Guerdos and fittingly, before it was played, it was dedicated “to all the ladies in the audience”; and subsequently, there was no doubt of it’s musical “epic-ness” as the music was accompanied by video footage of Link challenging the ways of the Guerdo to learn of the one male told of in legend, to be born and to lead – the one who would become Ganondorf, the dark and evil king.    The final encore was good, but a bit of a letdown, as it was a suite from Legend of Zelda:  Majora’s Mask; a game I never really got into when it released, because the surroundings and game mechanics were very different from what had come before (but it certainly has its fans).

In the end, it was a wonderful evening of fantastic music; a portal into the past and a childhood I was blessed to have and will happily never quite let go of. Of greatest imprtance though, this musical journey serves as a reminder that without the foundations of divine Wisdom and Courage, the pursuit of Power is but foolishness.

Love for Hyrule Always,

Aaron

Posted on by Aaron in Music, Video Games
Aaron

About Aaron

Author, Speaker, and Super Nerd. Aaron Welty speaks and writes regularly connecting the dots of life, faith, and science fiction. Originally from Michigan, he now lives and works in the Washington, D.C. Metro area.

One Response to A Hero’s Legend: An evening with the Music of Hyrule

  1. Karoll

    Heading up to Camp Quality in Lake Ann! Had so much fun last year and can’t wait to see everyone again!

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